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(Created page with ";David Webster House: David Webster Memorial at his former residence [[File:David Webster unveil plaque.png|thumb|Plaque being unveiled o...")
 
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;David Webster House:
 
;David Webster House:
  
[[File:David Webster RIP.jpg|thumb|David Webster Memorial at his former residence]]
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[[File:JM-House-2.jpg|thumb|James Mpanza House plaques]]
[[File:David Webster unveil plaque.png|thumb|Plaque being unveiled on his house]]
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[[File:Mpanza Lions on wall of his house.jpg|thumb|left|Mpanza Lions on the wall of the James Mpanza House]]
The house was purchased in 1986 by Maggie Friedman, who moved into the house together with her partner David Webster in August of that year. On 1st May 1989, David Webster was gunned down in front of the house at 13 Eleanor Street by a shotgun fired from a passing car. He died on the pavement.  The assassin was later revealed to be Ferdi Barnard of the apartheid regime’s Civil Cooperation Bureau (CCB).
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This house belonged to James Sofasonke Mpanza a prominent Squatter leader from the mid-1940s of the powerful squatter movement in “Shantytown”, a crusader for better housing for Johannesburg's Africans. The house was a significant site where public meetings used to take place (it practically became the headquarters of the Sofasonke movement). .
  
 
;Quick Facts:
 
;Quick Facts:
  
*'''JP Tile No.:''' 2
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*'''JP Tile No.:''' 3
*'''Building Age: ''' circa 1904
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*'''Building Age: ''' circa 1934
*'''Name of site:''' David Webster House  
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*'''Name of site:''' James Sofasonke Mpanza House  
*'''Stand no:''' Erf No.: 594 Troyeville
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*'''Street address:''' 1NO 957, Pheele Street, Orlando East
*'''Street address:''' 13 Eleanor Street, Troyeville
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*'''District/Province/Region:''' Johannesburg / Gauteng
 
*'''District/Province/Region:''' Johannesburg / Gauteng
 
*'''Ownership:'''
 
*'''Ownership:'''
**'''Previous Owner:''' Maggie Friedman
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**'''Previous Owner:''' James Sofasonke Mpanza House
**'''Present Owners:''' Veerle Dieltiens & Moloi
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**'''Present Owners:''' Elizabeth Mpanza (Daughter: Deceased September 2006)
 
*'''Site Type:''' Residential house
 
*'''Site Type:''' Residential house
*'''State of Conservation:''' The property is well-maintained and preserved.
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*'''State of Conservation:''' The property is in acceptable preserved condition.
<br>
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<br>    
  
;Inscription
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;Description                                                                             
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In 1999, ten years after the death of David Webster, Maggie Friedman and a group of David’s friends, put up a commemorative mosaic on the garden wall on the street side.  The inscription reads:
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DAVID WEBSTER 19 DEC. 1945 – 1 MAY 1989
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ASSASSINATED HERE FOR HIS FIGHT AGAINST APARTHEID
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LIVED FOR JUSTICE, PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP
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;Statement of Significance:​
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James Mpanza house is a small standard-type rectangular semi-detached house, with corner veranda under the main roof. The veranda has been enlarged. The available space on the erf has been effectively utilised by the construction of informal structures (shacks) backed onto the boundary. These structures are currently for rentals. It has an outside toilets with a communal tap mostly used by the tenants.
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The house is of political and historical significance because of its association with David Webster and because it marks the place of his assassination. His death came at a watershed time for the apartheid government. His activism, and the international outrage that followed the event, no doubt contributed in some measure to the subsequent political changes in the country.
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During the 1980s the house was often a meeting place of activists as well as a ‘safe house’ for people who were trying to avoid the attention of the security police.
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;CONSERVATION STATUS
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The house remained unchanged since the 1930’s, with symbolic lions figures still at their original places. Several shacks have been erected around the boundary of the Erf. The house itself is still in a fairly good condition with the interior well-maintained and original ceilings still intact.     
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 +
;STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE
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The house is closely associated with prominent Squatter leader James Mpanza.  It is strongly connected with important political and social movements in the history of Soweto, especially during the turbulent 1940s.  James Mpanza himself is a significant figure in our history, a founder and leader from the mid-1940s of the powerful squatter movement in “Shantytown”, a crusader for better housing for Johannesburg's Africans.
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Given the fact that many black people who came to urban areas were without proper residential or dwelling places, Mpanza’s role in the struggle for housing and shelter will remain significant.  Bearing in mind that at the time, the Orlando Advisory Board was the only organisation to represent black people in the urban areas, his house is a significant site where public meetings used to take place (it practically became the headquarters of the Sofasonke movement).
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;Legal Status (Decree/Act) 
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;NHRA:  Declared as a Provincial Heritage Site (Formal Protection status ) in Sept. 2011.
 +
 
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;Authority Responsible Provincial Heritage Resources Authority: Gauteng
  
 
You can read a more detailed article on Wikipedia.
 
You can read a more detailed article on Wikipedia.
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|-
 
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|style="width:35%;font-size:95%";color:#000"|
 
|style="width:35%;font-size:95%";color:#000"|
* [[wikipedia:en:David_Webster_House|This article is only available in English on Wikipedia]]
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* [[wikipedia:en:James_Mpanza_House|This article is only available in English on Wikipedia]]
 
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|}
 
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</div><br />

Revision as of 15:16, 23 January 2014

David Webster House
James Mpanza House plaques
Mpanza Lions on the wall of the James Mpanza House

This house belonged to James Sofasonke Mpanza a prominent Squatter leader from the mid-1940s of the powerful squatter movement in “Shantytown”, a crusader for better housing for Johannesburg's Africans. The house was a significant site where public meetings used to take place (it practically became the headquarters of the Sofasonke movement). .

Quick Facts
  • JP Tile No.: 3
  • Building Age: circa 1934
  • Name of site: James Sofasonke Mpanza House
  • Street address: 1NO 957, Pheele Street, Orlando East
  • District/Province/Region: Johannesburg / Gauteng
  • Ownership:
    • Previous Owner: James Sofasonke Mpanza House
    • Present Owners: Elizabeth Mpanza (Daughter: Deceased September 2006)
  • Site Type: Residential house
  • State of Conservation: The property is in acceptable preserved condition.


Description

James Mpanza house is a small standard-type rectangular semi-detached house, with corner veranda under the main roof. The veranda has been enlarged. The available space on the erf has been effectively utilised by the construction of informal structures (shacks) backed onto the boundary. These structures are currently for rentals. It has an outside toilets with a communal tap mostly used by the tenants.

CONSERVATION STATUS

The house remained unchanged since the 1930’s, with symbolic lions figures still at their original places. Several shacks have been erected around the boundary of the Erf. The house itself is still in a fairly good condition with the interior well-maintained and original ceilings still intact.

STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE

The house is closely associated with prominent Squatter leader James Mpanza. It is strongly connected with important political and social movements in the history of Soweto, especially during the turbulent 1940s. James Mpanza himself is a significant figure in our history, a founder and leader from the mid-1940s of the powerful squatter movement in “Shantytown”, a crusader for better housing for Johannesburg's Africans.

Given the fact that many black people who came to urban areas were without proper residential or dwelling places, Mpanza’s role in the struggle for housing and shelter will remain significant. Bearing in mind that at the time, the Orlando Advisory Board was the only organisation to represent black people in the urban areas, his house is a significant site where public meetings used to take place (it practically became the headquarters of the Sofasonke movement).

Legal Status (Decree/Act)
NHRA
Declared as a Provincial Heritage Site (Formal Protection status ) in Sept. 2011.
Authority Responsible Provincial Heritage Resources Authority
Gauteng

You can read a more detailed article on Wikipedia.


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